pH Pain Titration

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pH Pain Titration

Pain often originates when local tissues become over acidic or alkali. 

Dr. Revici noted that localized acidosis/alkalosis conditions where strongly dependent on systemic acidic/alkali balance. While the blood pH remains constant, components which influence systemic pH balance tend to have an amplified effect on the buffering process, which in turn can significantly affect localized tissues.

This test is designed to evaluate the systemic sensitivity to acid/base titration pain response by incrementally applying a metabolic acid, or a metabolic base, or both.

Revici noted three different combinations of pain response:

  • Acid tissue pain tends to respond to alkali substances (majority)
  • Alkali tissue pain tends to respond to acid substances (minority)
  • Transverse pain, involving both acid/alkali pain, in different locations tends to shift, depending on the pH component.

It is useful to note that different types of pathogens tend to create different localized pH imbalances:

  • Viruses – cold, flu & herpes created localized alkalosis, which tends to respond to acid supplements
  • Fungi – tends to create acidosis which tends to respond to alkali.

The test strategy is a simple titration using a 1-10 pain scale log on 5 minute intervals.  The acid titration uses monobasic ammonium phosphate, the alkali titration uses potassium bicarbonate.  Both substances are Generally Regarded as Safe, and are used as food additives. 

Revici discovered that the urine pH tended to indicate to shift with pain, either inverse or proportional.  Since lower numbers indicate the body is discarding acid, high pain with low urine suggests primarily acid pain, conversely higher pain with higher urine pH suggests alkali pain.


These tables enables a convenient record of the titration.  The pain areas reflect the tendency for more than one area to present discomfort. 

Use common sense.  Once you see an increase in pain for two consecutive titrations, do not continue.  This qualifies as a positive result. 

The pain titration model waits 5 minutes between intervals.  The initial time sets a baseline discomfort.  Use a pain scale from 0-10, 0 corresponding to no pain, 10 corresponding to unbearable.  At each time interval, consume 1 or 2 amounts of the titration agent.  For ammonium phosphate, this is 1 or 2 capsules, for potassium bicarbonate this is ¼ or ½ teaspoon in enough water for comfortable consumption.

Use a double titration based on body weight.  We suggest 175 lbs cutoff.  If you weigh less than 175, use a single dose titration, if over 175, use a double dose.

If pain escalates too much, it is often possible to reverse the acid pain using an alkali titration, and vice versa.

The before pH suggests whether you should begin with an acid or alkali titration.  If the urine pH is below 5.5, begin with an alkali titration because this value suggests that the pain may be primarily acidic in nature.  If the urine pH is above 5.5, then this suggests that pain may be primarily alkali in nature.

 

Before

After

Urine pH

 

 

Saliva pH

 

 

Use this chart to record titration results.  The pain areas support recording of discomfort in different areas of the body

Minute

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

Pain Area 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pain Area 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pain Area 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use this chart to record the secondary titration if necessary.

Minute

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

Pain Area 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pain Area 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pain Area 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
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